Many people who are new to photography may feel that the photography technology has stagnated after some time, the camera functions are very proficient, and the basic photography skills have also been mastered, but they always feel that others have taken better photos than themselves, and they can’t figure out why. Come, this is probably the time to start to improve “creative photography”!

 

Tip 1: Turn Your Camera

Photo by Emmy

Photo by Emmy32

Normally, you should lift the camera when taking photos to ensure that the picture will not be blurred due to camera shake during exposure, but turning your camera in a organized way can make the picture abstract and add artistic colors, especially this is more noticeable when you are pointing at a different color light source or shooting at night. The trick is to slow down your shutter so that you have enough time to capture the light. Horizontal movement and rotation are also commonly used techniques when shooting, and I will discuss it in another article.

Tip 2: Adjust Focus When Shooting

Pull effect

Photo by Alex Tam

Adjusting the focal length when shooting (commonly known as “zoom”) is actually when the camera releases the shutter to change the zoom, the resulting picture will be full of dynamics, is a very simple technique, but only applies to zoom lenses.

Tip 3: Creative Focus

Photo by Alex Tam

Photo Alex Tam

Who said that the focus must be on the subject? In fact, sometimes turning the camera to manual focus and deliberately deviating the subject from the focus can make it look like an oil painting.

Tip 4: Shoot from a Low Place

Photo by asmundur

Photo by asmundur

Try to use ultra-low angles to shoot objects, so that the subject looks different from normal eyes. If you add a wide-angle lens, you can highlight the subject and express an exaggerated effect.

Tip 5: Overexpose your Photos

Photo by

Photo by Yuanhao Li

Generally, photos will require “correct” exposure, which will not make the photo overexposed or underexposed, but there are moments when the photo is seriously overexposed to express a “sci-fi” effect.

Tip 6: Flash with Slow-sync

Photo by sko

Photo by sko

Slow shutter flash with "pulling" effect Photo by Dani_Girl

Slow shutter flash with “pulling” effect Photo by Dani_Girl

When shooting night portraits, you can use the slow sync shutter to absorb more of the scene light, and use the flash to “freeze” the subject. If you add the “pulling” technique mentioned in tip 2 to take a creative photo.

Tip 7: Shoot From a Height

Photo by Ric e Ette

Photo by Ric e Ette

Back to the shooting in Tip 4, we can also capture the picture from an angle, shoot down from high altitude. When shooting from an airplane, we can also use a tripod with a long shutter release or a selfie function. This effect, it is recommended to use a wide-angle or even a fisheye lens, the photos will be more interesting.

Tip 8: Multiple Exposures

Photo by Barbecued pork

Photo by Barbecued pork

Multiple exposures are to take multiple photos of the same film. You can use one normal focus and one out-focus to add artistic color to the photo or make a person appear multiple times in the photo like a person, but pay attention to some entry-level cameras they do not include multiple exposure functions, so you need to rely on Photoshop’s “layer” technology.

Tip 9: Increase Noise

Photo by Alex Tam

Photo by Alex Tam

When the ISO value is increased and the shutter is faster, the noise will be relatively increased, making the photos look uneven. But if we deliberately increase the noise and match the appropriate ambient atmosphere, the photo immediately brings a nostalgic, movie-like feel, making ordinary photos more flavorful.

Tip 10: Custom White Balance

Auto white balance on the left and manual white balance on the right (click to enlarge)

Auto white balance on the left and manual white balance on the right (click to enlarge)

The correct white balance can, of course, make the photo accurately display the light color of the displayed environment, but if we deliberately change the white balance setting, the photo may bring another special atmosphere and effect! As shown in the figure above, the left side is automatic white balance, and the right side is manual white balance. The right side can bring night and melancholy.

Tip 11: Make Good Use of the B shutter

Photo by iraklisan

Photo by iraklisan

Photo by bfv

Photo by bfv

B shutter is Bulb. When you set the camera to S-mode or M-mode and keep slowing the shutter down, the camera will display the word “Bulb”, then you are using the B shutter. The door means that the shutter is always open for exposure, and the shutter is not closed until the photographer presses the shutter button again. This technique can take very dark places into rich colors (such as the suburbs at night) and can also be used to shoot star trails and fireworks.

Tip 12: Infrared Photography

Infrared photo

Infrared photo

Infrared photography is more complicated because you need to modify your camera or add an infrared filter, but the effect is very special, like black and white photos but different. If you use a filter, the light will be blocked a lot, so it is recommended to use a tripod or high ISO.

In addition to the above Tips, you can also refer to the previous article five steps to take good photos!

Reference: http://digital-photography-school.com/adding-randomness-to-your-photos

 

Author: Alex Tam