What is Exposure Compensation (EV)?

The built-in light meter of modern cameras is very accurate, but sometimes the light meter will also be affected by the surface of the object to make a wrong judgment. The most common cases are:

  • Shoot a large area of white objects (such as wedding dresses)-the camera’s light meter will think the objects are bright (misjudgment), so the camera makes an error and lowers the exposure to make the exposure under-exposed;
  • Shooting large black objects (such as graduation gowns)-the camera light meter will think the objects are dark (misjudgment), so the camera makes an error and raises the exposure to make the photo overexposed;

The following figure is an example of shooting a large area of ​​white objects:

Camera misleads too dark

Camera misleads too dark

Return to normal after exposure compensation (+ EV)

Return to normal after exposure compensation (+ EV)

In these cases, we need to manually adjust the EV value to compensate. Now whether it is ordinary DC or DSLR, this function is included, usually the value is from -2 to +2 (more advanced cameras have + -3 or even 5), as shown below:

ev

 

The following is an example from EV-2 to EV + 2, so that you can understand the impact of EV value on exposure:

EV-2

EV-2

EV-1

EV-1

EV 0

EV 0

EV+1

EV+1

EV+2

EV+2

Tips

When I was just learning EV compensation, I often couldn’t figure out what needs to be + EV or -EV. In fact, there is a formula that is easy to remember:

**** When it is dark (-EV), when it is light (+ EV) ****

This is because when encountering a dark object, the camera will think it is dark and increase the exposure, so we have to reduce the EV to correct it, and vice versa. After reading this brief introduction, you can also try different adjustments!

Photo source: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/19/exposure-value/

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Author: Alex Tam