Choosing the right focus point is very important for a new photographer. If the focus point is incorrect, not only can you not take the photos you want, but also hinder the progress of photography technology, in this article I will demonstrate the relationship between focus point and the depth of field. I will also analyze the effect of the focus point in the photo at different positions.

The Relationship between Focus Point and Depth of Field

When taking a photo, the focus area must be clear, the front and back of the focus point will be affected by the depth of field, especially when the three elements that match the shallow depth of field, the further the object from the focus point, The deeper the depth of field will be, and the more blurred it will be. Let us look at these following examples:

(Example 1) Flowers in the Center, the Foreground and Background are Blurred

The red flower with the focus in the middle is blurred because of the shallow depth of field!

The red flower with the focus in the middle is blurred because of the shallow depth of field!

(Example 2) The Focus is on the Foreground, the Foreground is clear, and the Background is Blurred

Focus on the flowers in the foreground, and use the background windmill as a background, the shallow depth of field effect can highlight the subject.

Focus on the flowers in the foreground and use the background windmill as a background. The shallow depth of field blurs the background and highlights the subject in the foreground.

(Example 3) Focus on the Background, the Foreground is Blurred, and use the Foreground as a Frame for Composition

Focus on the background and use the foreground as a frame for composition. Of course, shallow depth of field will make the foreground blur and make the main subject of the background more prominent.

Focus on the background and use the foreground as a frame for composition. Of course, a shallow depth of field will make the foreground blur and make the main subject of the background more prominent.

It can be seen that when we select the focus point, we can make a shallow depth of field effect on the foreground and background scenes, making the foreground or/and background blurred. Of course, the larger the aperture or the longer the focal length, the shallow depth of field effect will be more obvious.

With a wide-angle lens, the shallow depth of field is not obvious ↓

Use a wide-angle lens, even with the largest aperture, the depth of field cannot be greatly reduced

Use a wide-angle lens, even with the largest aperture, the depth of field cannot be greatly reduced

Using a telephoto lens, the depth of field has much more shallow ↓

Using a focal length of 200mm, focusing on the flowers, plus a large aperture of f / 2.8, shallow depth of field easily achieved!

Using a focal length of 200mm, focusing on the flowers, plus a large aperture of f / 2.8, shallow depth of field easily achieved!

The theory is theoretical, and you may not know the actual operation after reading it. Now let’s take a look at some practical application examples!

Practical Application Examples

Let’s take a look at the panorama first. We used a wide-angle lens (16mm), with a small aperture (f / 16), focus the focus point in the middle of the photo (on the near hillside), so that the entire photo will also be within the depth of field and clear.

DSC_8721

A small aperture, focus in the middle = all clear (Nikon D700 f/16 16mm)

So how can you shoot in this environment? Let’s change the composition, focus point, and aperture, and find some interesting things to shoot!

(Shot 1) Focus on the Distant View

With the slightly larger apertures f/4 and f/2.8, we can focus on the hillside from a distance, so that we can blur the branches and grass in the foreground and make the scenery in focus more prominent.

Large aperture, focusing at a distance = blurred foreground, against the subject (Nikon D700 f / 2.8 50mm)

Large aperture, focusing at a distance = blurred foreground, against the subject (Nikon D700 f/4 50mm)

Note that sometimes we don’t need to overshadow the prospect, otherwise the reader may not know what that is!

Large aperture, focusing at a distance = blurred foreground, against the subject (Nikon D700 f / 2.8 50mm)

Large aperture, focusing at a distance = blurred foreground, against the subject (Nikon D700 f/2.8 50mm)

(Shot 2) Focus on the Close Shot

Find out what is interesting in the environment, and then use the large aperture (f/2.8) to focus on the subject (small flowers) and use a shallow depth of field to blur the background and highlight the subject.

Large aperture, close focus = blurred background, highlighting the subject

Large aperture, close focus = blurred background, protruding subject (Nikon D700 f/1.8 50mm)